USGS - science for a changing world

South Atlantic Water Science Center - Georgia

 South Atlantic WSC  Georgia office  Information/data  Projects  Publications  GWIN  RiverCam  Drought  Flood  About  Contact  Internal
Courtesy of Capesoft

 

NEWSROOM

 USGS Newsroom Home

  Get USGS News RSS

 Public Affairs Contacts

Georgia Contact

Mindy Dalton
1770 Corporate Drive
Suite 500
Norcross, GA 30093
(678) 924-6700
webmaster-ga@usgs.gov

NATIONAL NEWSROOM PRODUCTS

ABOUT THE GEORGIA
OFFICE

USGS Georgia Water Science Center Newsroom

Latest Georgia News Releases

 Researchers Test Smartphones for Earthquake Warning
Released:
Fri, 10 Apr 2015 14:15:00 EDT
Smartphones and other personal electronic devices could, in regions where they are in widespread use, function as early warning systems for large earthquakes according to newly reported research Crowdsourcing Smartphone Data Could Provide Valuable Advance Notice for People in Quake Zones

Contact Information:

Susan  Garcia, USGS ( Phone: 650-346-0998 ); Deborah Williams-Hedges, Caltech ( Phone: 626-395-3227 ); Jeannie  Kever, UH ( Phone: 713-743-0778 );

Additional contacts:  Alan Buis, JPL 818-354-0474, alan.d.buis@jpl.nasa.gov and Donna Sturgess, CMU-SI 412-551-7436, sturgessd@gmail.com

Note to Editors: This news release is available in Spanish and Chinese.

MENLO PARK, Calif.— Smartphones and other personal electronic devices could, in regions where they are in widespread use, function as early warning systems for large earthquakes according to newly reported research.

 Científicos ponen a prueba los teléfonos móviles inteligentes para la advertencia de terremotos
Released:
Fri, 10 Apr 2015 14:00:00 EDT
Los teléfonos móviles y otros dispositivos electrónicos personales podrían ayudar en las regiones donde se encuentran en uso generalizado, y pueden funcionar como sistemas de alerta para terremotos mayor según la nueva investigación científica recien publicada Crowdsourcing los teléfonos móviles podrían proporcionar datos valiosos y notificación avanzadas para habitantes viviendo en zonas de terremotos

Contact Information:

Susan Garcia, USGS ( Phone: 650-346-0998 ); Deborah Williams-Hedges, Caltech ( Phone: 626-395-3227 ); Jeannie  Kever, UH ( Phone: 713-743-0778 );

Contactos adicionales:  Alan Buis, JPL 818-354-0474 alan.d.buis@jpl.nasa.gov, Donna Sturgess, CMU-SI 412-551-7436 sturgessd@gmail.com

MENLO PARK, California — Los teléfonos móviles y otros dispositivos electrónicos personales podrían ayudar en las regiones donde se encuentran en uso generalizado, y pueden funcionar como sistemas de alerta para terremotos mayor según la nueva investigación científica recien publicada.

 Scientists Predict Massive Urban Growth, Creation of 'Megalopolis' in Southeast in Next 45 Years
Released:
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:10:00 EDT
Urban areas in the Southeastern United States will double in size by 2060 unless there are significant changes to land development, according to a new study by the Department of Interior’s Southeast Climate Science Center and North Carolina State University

Contact Information:

Adam Terando ( Phone: 919-515-4448 ); Christian Quintero ( Phone: 813-498-5019 );

RALEIGH, N.C.—Urban areas in the Southeastern United States will double in size by 2060 unless there are significant changes to land development, according to a new study by the Department of Interior’s Southeast Climate Science Center and North Carolina State University.

 View more USGS Georgia news releases

Latest USGS National News Releases

 Northern Alaska Coastal Erosion Threatens Habitat and Infrastructure
Released:
Wed, 1 Jul 2015 12:30:00 EDT
In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey found that the remote northern Alaska coast has some of the highest shoreline erosion rates in the world

Contact Information:

Ann Gibbs ( Phone: 831-460-7540 ); Paul  Laustsen ( Phone: 650-329-4046 );

This oblique aerial photograph from 2006 shows the Barter Island long-range radar station landfill threatened by coastal erosion. The landfill was subsequently relocated further inland, however, the coastal bluffs continue to retreat. (High resolution image)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey found that the remote northern Alaska coast has some of the highest shoreline erosion rates in the world.

 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Remain the Primary Threat to Polar Bears
Released:
Tue, 30 Jun 2015 13:30:00 EDT
Greenhouse gas emissions remain the primary threat to the preservation of polar bear populations worldwide. This conclusion holds true under both a reduced greenhouse gas emission scenario that stabilizes climate warming and another scenario where emissions and warming continue at the current pace, according to updated U.S. Geological Survey research models

Contact Information:

Paul  Laustsen ( Phone: 650-329-4046 ); Catherine Puckett ( Phone: 352-377-2469 );

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Greenhouse gas emissions remain the primary threat to the preservation of polar bear populations worldwide. This conclusion holds true under both a reduced greenhouse gas emission scenario that stabilizes climate warming and another scenario where emissions and warming continue at the current pace, according to updated U.S. Geological Survey research models.

 USGS Names New Director of St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
Released:
Tue, 30 Jun 2015 13:00:11 EDT
Cheryl J. Hapke begins work this week as the Director of the U.S. Geological Survey’s St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center Cheryl Hapke Takes Helm of 100-person Science Program This Week

Contact Information:

Cheryl Hapke ( Phone: 727-502-8068 ); Vic  Hines ( Phone: 813-855-3125 );

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Cheryl J. Hapke begins work this week as the Director of the U.S. Geological Survey’s St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center.

 Water Used for Hydraulic Fracturing Varies Widely Across United States
Released:
Tue, 30 Jun 2015 10:00:00 EDT
The amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country, according to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new USGS study accepted for publication in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union USGS Releases First Nationwide Map of Water Usage for

Contact Information:

Anne Berry Wade (USGS) ( Phone: 703-648-4483 ); Leigh Cooper (AGU) ( Phone: 202-777-7324 ); Tanya Gallegos ( Phone: 703-648-6181 );

The amount of water required to hydraulically fracture oil and gas wells varies widely across the country, according to the first national-scale analysis and map of hydraulic fracturing water usage detailed in a new USGS study accepted for publication in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

 Declining Water Levels Pose Challenges for Eastern Idaho Aquifer Monitoring
Released:
Mon, 29 Jun 2015 12:14:23 EDT
Last summer, water levels reached all-time lows in 177 wells used to monitor the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. As the region goes through its third year of drought, U.S. Geological Survey scientists, working in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, have assessed factors influencing water-level declines and how future declines might jeopardize some wells in the monitoring network

Contact Information:

Tim  Merrick ( Phone: 208-387-1305 ); Ryan  McClymont ( Phone: 503-251-3237 );

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho —Last summer, water levels reached all-time lows in 177 wells used to monitor the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. As the region goes through its third year of drought, U.S. Geological Survey scientists, working in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, have assessed factors influencing water-level declines and how future declines might jeopardize some wells in the monitoring network.

 Interior's Northeast Climate Science Center Releases Report to Help State Wildlife Managers in the Northeast and Midwest Alleviate Impacts of Climate Change on Species and Ecosystems
Released:
Mon, 29 Jun 2015 9:00:00 EDT
Interior Department’s Northeast Climate Science Center has released a report today synthesizing the latest information on the vulnerability of species and ecosystems to climate change in a 22-state region in the Northeast and Midwest U.S

Contact Information:

Michelle Staudinger ( Phone: 413-577-1318 ); Janet Lathrop ( Phone: 413-545-0444 ); Hannah Hamilton ( Phone: 703-648-4356 );

AMHERST, MASS—Interior Department’s Northeast Climate Science Center has released a report today synthesizing the latest information on the vulnerability of species and ecosystems to climate change in a 22-state region in the Northeast and Midwest U.S.

 New Screening Tool Protects Streams, Wetlands, and Residences From Landfill Risks
Released:
Mon, 29 Jun 2015 8:30:00 EDT
A new screening tool to assess the potential risk posed by contaminated groundwater moving from landfills to nearby streams, wetlands and residences has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Jersey Pinelands Commission. 

Contact Information:

Ron  Baker ( Phone: 609-771-3923 ); Paul  Leakan ( Phone: 609-894-7300 x 124 ); Hannah Hamilton ( Phone: 703-648-4356 );

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ – A new screening tool to assess the potential risk posed by contaminated groundwater moving from landfills to nearby streams, wetlands and residences has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Jersey Pinelands Commission. 

 View more USGS national news releases

USGS Home Water Resources Biology Geography Geology Geospatial

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior |U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/newsroom/
Page Contact Information: webmaster-ga@usgs.gov
Page Last Modified: Friday, 8-Feb-2013 15:09:11